Dean Batchelor Award-winning motorsports author Tim Considine says “Unequivocally, Ford v Ferrari is a TERRIFIC movie and evidenced by the enthusiastic applause at the end of the film, our opinion was shared virtually unanimously by the Academy audience.”

Featured image above courtesy of The Cahier Collection (Bernard Cahier)

Ford v Ferrari … Author Tim Considine’s Take

For obvious* reasons, I’ve been asked by many of my friends and readers if I’ve seen the movie, Ford v Ferrari, and what did I think.

Well … after missing several opportunities, I finally managed to catch an Academy screening over the weekend, with an audience admittedly comprised mostly of people who know and care little about motor racing.

Our reaction to the film? Unequivocally, Ford v Ferrari is a TERRIFIC movie and evidenced by the enthusiastic applause at the end of the film, our opinion was shared virtually unanimously by the Academy audience. Coincidentally, the following day, we found that most of the group with whom we watch recordings of Formula One races, had also just seen the movie – and genuinely enjoyed it. Unlike the industry audience, this is a group particularly and passionately informed about motor racing, and motor racing history.

Of course, we all laughed about obvious exaggerations, errors and inaccuracies, and flat out dramatic inventions. No, Shelby never took “the Deuce” for a terrifying ride in a Ford Mk II, and as far as anyone knows Ken Miles and Shelby never got into a fist fight, both fictions featured in lurid previews crafted for TV ads.

But again, though we could easily nitpick it apart, every one of us really liked the movie.

Ford v Ferrari is beautifully directed and cut, and brilliantly acted. The main historical themes are there. It impresses, makes you laugh when you should and touches your heart. And the racing sequences, which really are just a small part of the film, are damned exciting. Enough so for my wife, who is my first proofreader and quite knowledgeable on the subject of fast cars and close racing, to clutch my leg several times at thrilling moments. And as Alex Gurney – he plays his dad – had told me, the film company’s reproduction of the entire old Le Mans pits and front straight is incredible – or as he said, “Awesome!”

Point is, this is an old-fashioned Hollywood movie with more than enough to please anyone who enjoys a well-told story – NOT a documentary. But if you’re into good time movies, for sure, go see Ford v Ferrari. It’s one hell of a ride. – Tim Considine

Author Considine and the 2018 Motor Press Guild’s Dean Batchelor Award for “Twice Around The Clock”

*Editor’s Notes: The “obvious reasons” that motor racing historian  (and LACar guest writer) Tim Considine refers to above is his multi-award-winning “Twice Around the Clock – The Yanks at Le Mans” book (or I should say series of books) that cover the adventures of every American driver to compete in the 24 Hours of Le Mans from the first race in 1923.

Considine has immersed himself in the lore, legends, and cold, hard facts about the “Yanks” who have taken part in the grueling twenty-four-hour test of endurance, he had been preparing to write “Yanks” for many years and had personally interviewed nearly all of the major players who are portrayed in this new movie. Yanks was just announced as Motorsports Magazine‘s “Best Seller of the Week”, and is now available on Amazon from Toll Hall Sexton Books.

The first three volumes of “Yanks” are out now and the true story of Ford’s 1966 win at the famous French circuit is told not only in razor-sharp detail but in the voices of the people who were there racing.  – DS